Sirens by Joseph Knox

(4.5 / 5)

Aiden Waits is a youngish detective constable who is an absurd mess. He’s no hero. Too much of his past is catching up with him. Too much drink. Too much speed. Too many bad decisions. On his last legs professionally, he is sent undercover into London’s bloody underbelly to infiltrate a criminal enterprise headed up by Zain Carver, the prime suspect in a ten-year old unsolved murder of a young woman, a major drug dealer, and a notorious sex trafficker. In the process of his infiltrating, Aiden is also charged with rescuing the daughter of a politician named Isabelle Rossiter, a teenage runaway lured into Zain’s shadowy underworld, and Aiden must also find out which dirty cops are on Zain’s payroll. Aiden is completely expendable to the police force, which means he has nothing to lose, and may be the only person who can actually solve these crimes, save Isabelle, and restore some order to the police force. Friendless and alone when Isabelle turns up dead, Aiden is accused of rape and murder and is picked up by bad cops. If he can survive, he must vindicate himself of these crimes. But how?

Sirens is a bleak, powerful, visceral, gritty, engrossing, urban, debut novel. The characters are compelling. The prose if propelling. The scenery drags you down to the dark side.